Springback

Features

Spring Forward Live Stream: The Online Reviews Are In!

on Spring Forward 2016

AllThatICanBe - Vozdukh Dance Company

As “AllThatICanBe” opens, the floor undulates like tectonic plates shifting the topography of the stage. Two dancers tumble beneath layered sheets of paper as a third traipses through the landscape. It was surprising to learn the fragility of this sheath as the women tore it to bits, gathering misbehaving bundles that subsequently litter the stage. The women’s relationship with their prop feels one of obligation or, at times, oppression. Perhaps symbolizing societal expectations of women, they destroy and return to a thing that is, at best, an (visually stunning) inconvenience. Abandoning the paper, however, leaves them exposed, unsure. The women reluctantly rely on one another when unguarded by their security blanket; phrases downstage of discarded paper mounds is fraught with vulnerability until each dancer is enveloped by a paper cocoon. This moment, like many others, is sometimes freeing, sometimes disconcerting, always gratifying.

Lauren Warnecke, US

@artintercepts

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

LARA – Mirjam Sögner

Clad in silver Mirjam enters the stage, not quite sure where she is going. She moves across the room to find a restless pause on a chair, making awkward gestures towards the audience. She's the weird girl at the party sitting alone in the corner, trying to make conversation with whom ever. The communication is way off, and way interesting. Between both animalistic and robotic gestures, tics and repetitive quirks, she is difficult to pin down, but magnetic because of it.

LARA is a theatrical and tragicomic piece that makes me think of the troubled interactions between modern day people. Is interacting really that challenging? For LARA is seems almost impossible and only a little easier when the light goes out. Though Sögner is storming through the 4th wall and over the edge of the stage, her character keeps herself hidden in the background

Ida Fredericia, Denmark

 

A linear, simple and charismatic performance. The dancer's movement is as if it were made of small particles of energy interconnected in a sparkling flow. That induced me in wanting more and more of this dance.

The choreography seems simple but as it is full in details (sharp and quick moves in arms, legs, neck), it reveals the vast capabilities of the dancer.  In the last part, the picture shots resemble a gallery exhibition. Overall, an inventive and brilliant performance.

Virginia Alizioti, Greece

 

Lara is a research on a human’s ability to embody something artificial, something that people created themselves arguably against nature. Mirjam Sogner’s movements make an impression that everything you see is made of pixels. Even the facial expressions, even the slightest movement of finger seems to be transferred to computer. Like the revolution of The Sims computer game, abstract movements increasingly take on more detailed, natural action. Sogner works a lot on stopping and beginning the movement and this is how body starts to work like an artificial reality.

Her body has traces of the human, but with such precise limits that we are taken to the restricted reality – we have a clear sense of what might happen and what will not. It is rather feeling than perception while watching a person trying to make a lot of actions but being stopped every second.

Aušra Kaminskaitė, Lithuania

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

This is The Title – Ima Iduozee

“This is the Title” is not only a dance show, but a character created through dance, a live writing of a story. Ima Iduozee eclectically and organically mixes his break dance and contemporary background into a quantic fluid story. The easiness with which the dancer creates forms and connections between phrases is a definite plus to the overall storytelling. His movements become dictated by accents, impulses and nuances, which raise the dancer from lower to upper plan and back. Thus, the space becomes filled with dynamicity and emotions, reason and heart, especially towards the end of the performance. The work transcends the material and develops into a fluid dialogue and interaction with the internal world of the dancer."

Roxana Marin, Romania

@RoxanaMarin

A solo performer moving ceaselessly by combining contemporary techniques and elements of break dance without losing his contact with the white floor.  The soft movement illuminates his virtuosity without being pretentious.  The   initial silence moving to discreet noises, enhances the minimalistic aesthetic. The light design defines the space, creating gradually a kinetic and powerful scenography in where a dynamic game evolves between the dancer and the space. As the time passes, a sweet exhaustion of the body is caused.  All   the elements of the performance are used in equilibrium, creating a neutral landscape. A very good example how a unique body and his abilities can fill the stage without   redundant   information...an   efficient   way   to   evolve   an   anthem   to   the   notion   of simplicity!

Elena Novakovits, The Netherlands

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

Point of You – Anna Reti & Ricardo Machado

Point of You has a playful approach.  The two dancers pull from objects, word games, choreographed movement sequences, and the audience to populate and colour their performance.  Two memorable objects include a balloon and chair. With the balloon, Machado - lying on the floor - slowly allows the string of the balloon to be drawn out of his mouth.  The balloon begins to float higher and higher as the string continues to lengthen from within his mouth.  The image produced is levitation.  A word association game is played with the chair serving as the source of inspiration.  The two dancers take turns completing the sentence “ This chair can be a . . . “ This game gives insight to the quick thinking of the duet and thought process of the work. Humour and playfulness are palpable energies between the performers that to stay between them leaving the audience to witness the games. 

Emily Jeffries, Germany

www.emily-jeffries.com

This performance was by all means "Alive and ... Kicking"! The sequence of simple steps kept me in full attention to see what will happen next, where these simple steps will lead. It is a brilliant way to depict what's happening in our lives with all these "IT" (things, thoughts, concerns, images, problems). Overall, a vibrant, full, surprising, unique, inventive and multi-phased performance, like life itself!

Virginia Alizioti, Greece

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

Everything is OK – Marco D’Agostin

Everything is OK has an airy expression of continuous movement.  The music by LSKA provides an atmospheric soundscape. The soft noise bobbles between random sounds and a rhythm giving insight to the ethereal performative state of D’Agostin.  He moves constantly throughout the stage with delicate casual gestures in the hands and arms, which are integrated with soft technical movements of the body. This combination of movement reveals the humanity driving the performance.

His awareness of the audience is present.  Aware he is being watched and welcomes the gaze of the audience.  Without provoking he seems to prod the audience with questions.  Are you watching? How do you feel? Are you tired? Will you keep watching after you are tired?  These questions seem have more weight than the possible answers.  Which references the title, Everything is OK. 

Emily Jeffries, Germany

www.emily-jeffries.com

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

TheWOMANhouse – Andreas Constantinou

Four performers physically dominate the stage in a clear example of stereotypical masculinity. The movement is aggressive and performed powerfully. As the piece progresses we come to see these masculine performers are women. Their physicality, clothing, and facial hair are excellent masks. When clothing is removed and bodies are revealed as female typical masculine behaviour is questioned.  

The piece explores gender with a performative approach; however, the presentation of gender is strongly codified as male/female. I question why, in Constantinou’s work, he separates men and women, masculine and feminine.  Physical strength, aggressive behaviour, and a macho persona are far too easy characteristics to rely on in approaching gender in today’s society. Luckily, a solo is performed providing quilt-like gender gestalt near the end of the work.  The performer dances as an individual, negating the predetermined gender stereotypes.

Emily Jeffries, Germany

www.emily-jeffries.com

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

Let Me Die In My Footsteps – ME-SA, BOD.Y & Renan Martins de Oliveira

Four bodies on stage start their performative journey as an organic whole. Four performers through tactile sensation struggle to be together and not loose their contact using dynamic qualities. The live soundscape that is processed on stage by the guitarist initially operates as an informal interval for the dancers to calm down. As time gradually passes, there seems to be only

a unique body in a multidimensional motion.  Each movement appears as an extension to someone elses movement. Suddenly the bodies leave the stage, while the guitarist starts an aggressive solo. The performers return calmer, using more conventional kinetic vocabulary. The sound break seems somehow incongruous and separates the choreographic material into two parts. But how relevant are these two? It would be better the choreographer to maintain and extend the first part/idea increasing an obsessive rhythm on stage totally adhesive for the viewer’s eye,so the piece would be more consistent to a certain choice without complicating heterogeneous elements.

Elena Novakovits, The Netherlands

 

Push-and-pull, pull-and-push -again. The jostling interaction among four dancers in “Let Me Die In My Footsteps” brings the emotional strain in people’s
relationship, conditioned with morbid attachments and lack of individual freedom.

A live guitar earnestly strums compassion and sympathy towards the strenuous action on the stage. The contrasting mood continues with destructive change in the soundscape, which alternates with a new quality of dancers' playful and joyful physical coexistence. Martins shapes this physical coexistence into a centipede - like - figure, which skilfully coordinates all its eight legs into symmetrical footstep, perceiving the right direction only kinaesthetically. 

Shall we stop controlling our relationship with others? Shall we learn how to perceive the other - like one of the centipede's legs - and let it’s aligned footstep just happen? 

Maria Prokhorova, Finland

@LiikekieliCom

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

AU - Christian UBl & Kylie Walters

Kylie Walters is such a charismatic person she could probably embody the whole Australia. Luckily, in AU she does not have to do that – it is enough to base the ironic performance about the Australians’ and Austrians’ identity on a few well-known signs. The colorful stage, a few fictitious flags, some text, representing the idea that AU could mean everything – this is the material that supports a search of an identity. However, true identity appears only when Kylie Walters, Christian UBL and even musician Seb Martel meet each other. They all seem to be either a bunch of animals or a company of aboriginals, unlocking their instincts, astonishment and stupid appearance. Inside, are we all then animals with our own characters? Probably yes, because the moment we confront fear or a danger for our lives, instincts usually surpass our characters.

Aušra Kaminskaitė, Lithuania

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

Staying Alive - Jasna L. Vinovrski

Jasna L.Vinovrski does not represent immigrants. She just takes the impression of a lot of ridiculous difficulties these people have to face to stay alive in another country. Most of them really need some training and probably all of them seem so unnecessary. Beginning with the simple tasks she just goes forward by doing the same thing just with some improvements. Those may be a higher speed, singing Stayin’ alive, or trying to take a bunch of books while keeping an iPad on Vinovrski’s head. But this is life – usually somebody gives us some ridiculous tasks.

At the end the stage sinks into darkness and we cannot see anything except the moving lyrics of Stayin’ alive – the only thing you can see when asked to deal we totally ridiculous tasks. Though by the way this idea is moving we can see how funnily and pointlessly dancer is still performing. Because to stay alive we usually choose to obey rather than confront.

Aušra Kaminskaitė, Lithuania

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

As Long As Holding Hands - Tereza Ondrová Peter Šavel

Love has a lot of shapes, stages, sounds. It evolves into other feelings but can we say that it is not love anymore? According to dancers Tereza Ondrova and Peter Šavel, love usually begins in a
quite traditional or classical way. Clasped together while an opera aria plays, this love appears pure, plain, even boring. But like in a real life, after the honeymoon period comes the reality of the
true identity of your lover. This is what happens when both dancers just stop and begin to talk about each other and this is the most important thing – they do not talk about themselves. They
focus on the other person either praising or critisising him/her. This performance is not only about different forms of loving. It also shows that we might be absolutely ordinary people who do not
have anything wise to say but while we are in a strong relation with another person, we might become perfect. Or at least look like that.

Aušra Kaminskaitė, Lithuania

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here

 

Striptease - Pere Faura

It is not about the striptease – it is about research material behind the striptease. Faura's lecture performance has an ironic attitude towards the scientific theories about the striptease rather than
striptease itself, by literally turning the camera onto the audience. There we find a question not only for the audience, but also for theatre critics and scientists – must every movement have a semiotic significance? Well, every movement actually has significance, at least historically, but it still does not mean that the same symbolism should be used nowadays. Same goes for striptease itself – we should not trust the traditional definition of the word since what the dancer exposes depends on what we want and expect to see on a stage.

Aušra Kaminskaitė, Lithuania

Read the Springback Academy Reviews of this performance here


← Back to Features

Spring Forward
28 – 30 April 2017

Watch on demand: aerowaves.org/springforward

Connect with Aerowaves for the latest news about Spring Forward